Book launch: ‘Studio Studies: Operations, Topologies and Displacements’

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You are cordially invited to celebrate the launch of the edited collection: ‘Studio Studies: Operations, Topologies, Displacements’ edited by Ignacio Farías (Munich Center for Technology in Society) and Alex Wilkie (Goldsmiths, Design Department).

Studio Studies is being launched over two events, the first (at Goldsmiths) with a focus on the social sciences and the second (at the V&A) with a focus on the arts and design.

18th February 2016  | 4pm – 6pm

Book launch at Goldsmiths

Room 137A Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths, University of London

  • Introduction: Alex Wilkie
  • Studio operations: Ignacio Farías & Mirja Busch
  • Afterword: Professor Mike Michael
  • Discussion: chaired by Isaac Marrero Guillamon

Followed by a drinks reception.

Supported by the Centre for the Study of Invention and Social Process

19th February 2016 | 6:30pm

Book launch at the Design Culture Salon

Clore 55, Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

Panel discussion chaired by Lucy Kimbell, University of Arts, London.
Panel: Professor Daniel Charny (Kingston); Ignacio Farías; Yiyun Kang (V&A Artist in Residence); Professor Peter Lloyd (Brighton) & Alex Wilkie.

 

About the book:

Studio Studies is an agenda setting volume that presents a set of empirical case studies that explore and examine the studio as a key setting for aesthetic and material production. As such, Studio Studies responds to three contemporary concerns in social and cultural thought: first, how to account for the situated nature of creative and cultural production; second, the challenge of reimagining creativity as a socio-materially distributed practice rather than the cognitive privilege of the individual; and finally, to unravel the parallels, contrasts and interconnections between studios and other sites of cultural-aesthetic and technoscientific production, notably laboratories. By enquiring into the operations, topologies and displacements that shape and format studios, this volume aims to demarcate a novel and important object of analysis for empirical social and cultural research as well to develop new conceptual repertoires to unpack the multiple ways studio processes shape our everyday lives.

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