Goldsmiths Design Festival 2017: Wendy Lau re-interprets human rights

For her graduation project from the MA in Design: Critical Practice, Wendy Lau explores human rights through a series of activities that question our own perspectives and priorities on the issue, as well as encourage us to understand other people’s perspectives:

“I started with an observation on human rights nowadays, and I initially thought I could come up with tangible solutions or a design strategy to deal with the situation. However, after research, I found that the issue was really complex, so instead I tried to provide an experience to get the audience to understand, or to start thinking about the importance of human rights. So, this is a proposal and it consists of five sections of interaction which explore different perspectives on approaching human rights. The experience is trying to get the participants not only to express what it means to have human rights, but also to question the response of others, and start to re-think the various interpretations.Read More »

Back to the Breast with Carina Hardy

If you were around the Goldsmiths campus one particular sunny Friday this year in May, you couldn’t have failed to notice a pair of giant, inflatable breasts adorning our College green. Interested visitors could even crawl inside through an underwire, and see the sun through giant a nipple ceiling! The eye-catching installation is the work of Carina Hardy, a student of Barnard College (New York) who spent one year in the Design department at Goldsmiths. The giant boobs have travelled far before they arrived to Goldsmiths, since they were built in Bali and previously exhibited at Wonderfruit festival in Thailand. But why inflatable breasts, and what does it all mean? Carina explains:

How the breasts were made

This project posed some extreme challenges because I was committed to make them entirely out of sustainable materials. The ultimate goal was to compost them at the end of their life. After a series of material tests and prototypes we built the membrane structure out of organic cotton and coated the fabric in natural latex. I built them in Bali, where I was raised, with the help of a master tailor and a team. The natural liquid latex is hand-painted onto a total of 64 panels, and we pigmented the canvas because I didn’t want the default to be white breasts – watching the pigment change over time has been really interesting as well. It was a very intense material to figure out because it’s so sticky. The latex had to be brushed with baby powder so that it wouldn’t stick to itself.Read More »

Rose Sinclair takes part in Caribbean Carnival Festival at the V&A

This Sunday, Goldsmiths Design’s Rose Sinclair will be at the V&A, taking part in their Caribbean Carnival Festival held in celebration of the 30th Anniversary of Black History Month.

Rose will run a workshop/talk about fabrics found in the National Archives that have a connection to Caribbean Carnival and celebrations such as Junkanoo. All with original 1950’s music! The event is free and anyone can drop in.

Seminar Room 2, Sackler Centre
14.00 – 15.00 and 15.30 – 16.30

 

Musée des Refusés: Refusal, Renunciation, Resistance

We’re starting the first year of our new MA in Design: Expanded Practice with an all-day conference featuring an amazing line-up of speakers!

When: 3 October 2017, 10:00am – 6:00pm

Where: Hexagon, Lockwood Building

The archetypal museum is a concretization of the Enlightenment ‘knowledge project’. It is a storehouse of knowledge; gathering examples, categorising and classifying them and defining a field of knowledge and practice. This archetypical museum is a place to collect, preserve, interpret, and display items of artistic, cultural, or scientific significance (a) for the edification of publics, (b) as resources for the contemplation of ‘expert’ communities and/or (c) to act as a safety deposit to preserve things that have been deemed to be of cultural and historical importance (who deems them ‘important’ is a moot matter).

Morning: Perspectives
Catherine Ince: ‘Rationales for Refusal’
Dee Halligan: ‘Museum Says No: A Strategists Take on Reasons Museums Don’t, Can’t or Shouldn’t Acquire’
Oli Stratford: ‘The Amazing Collapsing Journal’
Kristina Rapacki: ‘The Museum of Failure’

Afternoon: Alter Museums 
Alexandra Midal: ‘Ho(l)me(s) Sweet Home: Design and Serial Killing at the Dawn of the Industrial Revolution’
Matthew Plummer-Fernandez: ‘Your Output My Input’
Carl Clerkin: ‘The Learned Society of Extra Ordinary Objects’
Maki Suzuki: ‘Do You Want Me to Give a Guided Tour of My Wallet, Then?’