“Iterations” preview: Spirits in the Wardrobe

The first ever graduation show for the MA in Design: Expanded Practice at Goldsmiths will be open to the public on 14-16 December 2018. As we approach the day of the exhibition opening, we’re giving you a preview of the diverse projects that will be on display. Today, we’re looking at the graduation project of Chang Wang, which looks into how we define what is “new” when it comes to fashion and our relationship with the clothes we already have:

“This project introduces the term ‘psychological obsolescence’ as a starting point, indicating that the feeling of ‘new’ can be driven by our ever-changing state of mind and fluid perception toward the same piece of clothing. In this light, our clothes may remain new when they stay alive in their connection with us, as they can keep updated along with the changes in ourselves.

‘Spirits in the Wardrobe’ thus indicate that our clothes are imbued with this energy and aliveness that signify a newness, which challenge the simplistic definition of being ‘new’, and shopping as the major way to acquire the ‘new’. The changing room onsite is a capsule showroom of the project. It can be a screening room, where visitors can watch and listen a mixed group of people getting dressed, with a ritualistic beauty they never recognised before. It is also a meditation room, where they can enjoy the quietness and have an inner conversation with the clothes they are just wearing. Ultimately, it is a room for transformative experiences, in which visitors can be inspired to capture and curate the poetry running through their clothes, and seek autonomy to create the newness with them.”

“Iterations” preview: Digital (rough hewn) fabrication

The first ever graduation show for the MA in Design: Expanded Practice at Goldsmiths will be open to the public on 14-16 December 2018. As we approach the day of the exhibition opening, we’re giving you a preview of the diverse projects that will be on display. Today, we’re looking at the graduation project of Kawisara Anansaringkarn, which aims to maintain the legacy of craft in the digital era by introducing imperfections to the 3D printing process:

“Realising the value of imperfection in the crafting process is an important area of craft production. The aim of making sincere products for craftsmen makes craft provide a beautiful rough hewn aesthetic, which is appreciated by others because of its character and individual value.

Although 3D clay printing has come to play an increasingly important role in craft, using it as a method of accurately materialising a digital model is not part of the craft process. This consideration has led to the exploration and examination of the imperfections in a 3D clay printing process. Attention has shifted from materialised work, which resembles its digital master, to awareness that the process of turning data into a physical form is never seamless. Variation is a common factor that occurs during the craft process. This project uses its own imperfections to inform the new instructions for the machine, at which point the variation becomes apparent. Within this process, variation creates outcomes that emphasise the value of individuality and identity that tend to be associated with the rough-hewn language of craft.”

“Iterations” preview: projects on Black British feminism and neurodiversity

The first ever graduation show for the MA in Design: Expanded Practice at Goldsmiths will be open to the public on 14-16 December 2018. As we approach the day of the exhibition opening, we’ll be giving you a preview of the diverse projects that will be on display. Today, we’re looking at the graduation projects of Lisa George and Thomas Goldstone.

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Design students talk about the process of creating this year’s Goldsmiths Prize trophy

As in previous years, the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize for fiction was designed and made by Goldsmiths Design students. This year’s designers Maja Nordblom and Samuel Warren describe the process of creating the trophy:

“After being commissioned to design and make the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize, we began discussing and drawing out possible designs. We realised quite quickly what materials and compositions we could utilise in order for our trophy to stand out and most importantly be unique from previous years. Therefore, we decided to focus on casting, incorporating a metal structure and weight to the trophy. We wanted the final object to not include a base, rather making it unique as a free standing sculptural object. We realised the incorporation of metal dusts into the casting process gave the piece enough weight and stability alone. The form of the object is the official logo of the literary prize, which before this year had only been incorporated as a smaller part of the trophy itself.Read More »