MULTIPLEXER MALFICTION lecture: JAMES AUGER_CRAP FUTURES

When: Wednesday 10 May, 6 pm

Where: Professor Stuart Hall Building, Room LG02

Crap Futures is a blog about futures, innovation, politics, technology by JAMES AUGER and JULIAN HANNA.

Crap in this context means underwhelming, disappointing, poorly thought out, badly done, inadequate, or sad. Nonsense or drivel.

Crap Futures casts a critical eye on corporate dreams and emerging technologies. It asks questions about where society is heading, who is taking us there, and whether ‘there’ is where we really want to end up.

James Auger is an Associate Professor at Madeira Interactive Technologies Institute, Portugal. On graduating from Design Products at the Royal College of Art in 2001 James moved to Dublin to conduct research at Media Lab Europe (MLE) exploring the theme of human communication as mediated by technology. After MLE he worked in Tokyo as guest designer at the Issey Miyake Design Studio developing new concepts for mobile telephones. Between 2005 and 2015 James was part of the critically acclaimed Design Interactions department at the RCA, teaching on the MA programme and continuing his development of critical and speculative approaches to design and technology, completing his PhD on the subject in 2012. Running parallel to his academic work, James is half of the speculative design practice Auger-Loizeau, a collaboration founded in 2000. Auger-Loizeau projects have been published and exhibited internationally, including MoMA, New York; 21_21, Tokyo; The Science Museum, London; The National Museum of China, Beijing and Ars Electronica, Linz. Their work is in the permanent collection at MoMA.

Julian Hanna is an Assistant Professor at M-ITI. His writing on modernist and avant-garde culture has appeared in numerous academic journals as well as The Atlantic, 3:AM, Berfrois, Minor Literature[s], and elsewhere. He has written a guide to modernism, Key Concepts in Modernist Literature, and co-wrote a guide to critical futures called Futurish. Since moving to Madeira in 2013 his research has shifted toward futures studies, design fiction, digital storytelling, and livability.