Cynthia Voza Lusilu explores community-based support for mental health

Cynthia Voza Lusilu (MA Design: Expanded Practice 2019) is one of the four young designers chosen by the Design Museum for their Designers in Residence programme to respond to this year’s theme of “Care”. The work she will be developing as part of the residency is a continuation of her MA project “Healing Chronicles”, which aimed to facilitate discussion around mental health support in Black British communities. 

Cynthia's Healing Chronicles toolkit at the 2019 MA Design Expanded Practice show: Confluence
Cynthia’s Healing Chronicles toolkit at the 2019 MA Design Expanded Practice show: Confluence

Cynthia was inspired to talk about mental health after her encounter with GARA (Goldsmiths Anti-Racist Action) during their occupation of Deptford Town Hall in 2019, when students gathered to share their experiences as people of color: “My own experiences resonated with them and I felt like it was a way to validate them. The type of space that they managed to create is valuable and important, it allows people to talk about what they are going through on a collective level. Unfortunately, a lot of spaces and institutions are not designed to take into account the wellness of Black people, and the collective traumas that Black communities can go through because of systemic racism have a direct impact on their wellbeing. This is a problem of public concern.” Continue reading “Cynthia Voza Lusilu explores community-based support for mental health”

Fashion Constellations exhibition on display in the Constance Howard Gallery

The exhibition “Fashion Constellations: blueprints towards expanding fashion practice” is currently open in the Constance Howard Gallery at Goldsmiths; visitors can drop by Monday to Friday between 11 am- 5 pm.

The items on display document the teaching process on the Fashions & Embodiment Studio of the MA in Design: Expanded Practice (and the MA in Fashion before it).

Programme co-lead Ruby Hoette and lecturer Katherine May asked MA students to bring in old denim garments and ‘upick’ them, then sew them together into a quilt, exchanging stories and ideas as they go. The outcome is always different and unpredictable, while the process of this relaxed activity functions as a bonding and engagement opportunity as well as a conversation and questioning of fashion ethics.

In the exhibition, you’ll be able to see the resulting denim quilts made by successive cohorts of students, as well as other artifacts, images and texts.