“Iterations” preview: Digital (rough hewn) fabrication

The first ever graduation show for the MA in Design: Expanded Practice at Goldsmiths will be open to the public on 14-16 December 2018. As we approach the day of the exhibition opening, we’re giving you a preview of the diverse projects that will be on display. Today, we’re looking at the graduation project of Kawisara Anansaringkarn, which aims to maintain the legacy of craft in the digital era by introducing imperfections to the 3D printing process:

“Realising the value of imperfection in the crafting process is an important area of craft production. The aim of making sincere products for craftsmen makes craft provide a beautiful rough hewn aesthetic, which is appreciated by others because of its character and individual value.

Although 3D clay printing has come to play an increasingly important role in craft, using it as a method of accurately materialising a digital model is not part of the craft process. This consideration has led to the exploration and examination of the imperfections in a 3D clay printing process. Attention has shifted from materialised work, which resembles its digital master, to awareness that the process of turning data into a physical form is never seamless. Variation is a common factor that occurs during the craft process. This project uses its own imperfections to inform the new instructions for the machine, at which point the variation becomes apparent. Within this process, variation creates outcomes that emphasise the value of individuality and identity that tend to be associated with the rough-hewn language of craft.”

“Iterations” preview: projects on Black British feminism and neurodiversity

The first ever graduation show for the MA in Design: Expanded Practice at Goldsmiths will be open to the public on 14-16 December 2018. As we approach the day of the exhibition opening, we’ll be giving you a preview of the diverse projects that will be on display. Today, we’re looking at the graduation projects of Lisa George and Thomas Goldstone.

 

Read More »

Design students talk about the process of creating this year’s Goldsmiths Prize trophy

As in previous years, the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize for fiction was designed and made by Goldsmiths Design students. This year’s designers Maja Nordblom and Samuel Warren describe the process of creating the trophy:

“After being commissioned to design and make the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize, we began discussing and drawing out possible designs. We realised quite quickly what materials and compositions we could utilise in order for our trophy to stand out and most importantly be unique from previous years. Therefore, we decided to focus on casting, incorporating a metal structure and weight to the trophy. We wanted the final object to not include a base, rather making it unique as a free standing sculptural object. We realised the incorporation of metal dusts into the casting process gave the piece enough weight and stability alone. The form of the object is the official logo of the literary prize, which before this year had only been incorporated as a smaller part of the trophy itself.Read More »

Iterations- the first MA Design: Expanded Practice degree show

  • Press and Industry Private View: 13 December 2018, 6 pm
  • Public opening: 14-16 December

Fifteen months is the time it takes for the earth to cycle once around the sun, and a little bit more. In this time, 101 humans from 28 different countries came together for the first iteration of the new MA Design: Expanded Practice, here at Goldsmiths University of London.

Being the first year of the course, we aimed to create a path for those who follow, in which processes are constantly evolving, traditions are shifting and influencing the trajectory of design.

Bringing post-disciplinary design to the forefront of academia, we have developed a conscious space around us, personally and publicly, that considers the environment, access and intersectional social contexts. We embody experiences, to strengthen how we design, communicate, participate, interact and innovate.

This exhibition presents work at the culmination of this period of study, acting as a crucial point that marks the start of the next chapter in our individual practices. Our multicultural community has encouraged the exchange of knowledge and skills, resulting in the redefinition of design practices, methods and language.

This is the beginning.