Design students talk about the process of creating this year’s Goldsmiths Prize trophy

As in previous years, the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize for fiction was designed and made by Goldsmiths Design students. This year’s designers Maja Nordblom and Samuel Warren describe the process of creating the trophy:

“After being commissioned to design and make the trophy for the 2018 Goldsmiths Prize, we began discussing and drawing out possible designs. We realised quite quickly what materials and compositions we could utilise in order for our trophy to stand out and most importantly be unique from previous years. Therefore, we decided to focus on casting, incorporating a metal structure and weight to the trophy. We wanted the final object to not include a base, rather making it unique as a free standing sculptural object. We realised the incorporation of metal dusts into the casting process gave the piece enough weight and stability alone. The form of the object is the official logo of the literary prize, which before this year had only been incorporated as a smaller part of the trophy itself.Read More »

1.1 +1: First year project

For their first brief on the BA Design course, first year students were asked to choose, analyse and define a V&A collection, whether materially, conceptually, politically, or in terms of use or meaning. They were then asked to design one more object that belongs with the collection based on their rationale. Here are some photos from the mini-show exhibiting the outcomes:

The brief is a first reflection on the sessions students have undertaken previously this term in two weeks of introductory Technical Studies, and one week of Methods and Processes. More photos of the exhibition can be found on Flickr.

Goldsmiths Graduate Design Scheme: Dorota Bojanowska turns women’s stories into unique printed garments

The Graduate Design Scheme is an opportunity for Goldsmiths Design graduates to return on campus and work on their own projects: for a fee, they can use a studio space, the workshops, and book machinery. This year, the Design department awarded two bursary places on the scheme to 2018 graduates. One of the winners is Dorota Bojanowska:

What was the idea and process behind your graduation project?

“Girl Girl Girl” is an ongoing design project that has been created to present the beauty of individualism and values that cannot be found within the materialism of the digital culture. The process involves receiving direct responses from women with different stories and experiences (presented in a form of a letter) and then transforming them into a symbolic print. The woman decides which story to share. Each of the letters is handwritten and with unique personal language. The boiler suit that becomes the final form is an un-gendered, multi-use mono garment for everyday wear, representing one of a kind empowerment and beauty.

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The project opens up another possibility for women to articulate their opinions and views. It becomes a discussion starter for other viewers when presented in public. What is their reaction? What’s their opinion? How is this message being communicated to the world?

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Goldsmiths Graduate Design Scheme: Ash Baigent brings a new gender equality platform to the skate park

The Graduate Design Scheme is an opportunity for Goldsmiths Design graduates to return on campus and work on their own projects:  for a fee, they can use a studio space, the workshops, and book machinery. This year, the Design department awarded two bursary places on the scheme to 2018 graduates; one of the winners is Ash Baigent, who will use her time in the workshops to continue her work designing and making unique skateboards.

Ash Baigent, photo by Aoife Baigent

Ash has been skateboarding since she was ten, and is now part of an all girl skate crew called Nefarious, who she met three years ago. There are few skateboarding women in the media, and even fewer (if any) are manufacturing their own skateboard decks. In fact, as Ash explains, skaters in England usually use decks imported from China or the US, and the designs can often be offensive or degrading towards women. The Goldsmiths graduate is keen to work on both the gender equality and the sustainability aspect of her favourite activity: she wants to bring more women to skateboarding and to encourage them to design their own decks. She’s also interested in making the decks themselves cheaper and more environmentally friendly, by experimenting with local, British wood instead of the usual American maple.

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